British Manufacturing History

My exploration of the story of British Manfacturing

My Blog

I write blogs as my research progresses and so the earlier ones relate to my previous project Dunkirk to D Day, although they are linked. The men of whom I wrote had feet in both camps, they stepped up as soldiers in two world wars, but then pursued careers in British manufacturing. I wrote an article on Civilian Expertise in War published in the Historian, the magazine of The Historical Association.

Aluminium and hydroelectric power

Aluminium was one of the darlings of the Festival of Britain. It is strong but light. It is plentiful and relatively green in terms of being produced by hydroelectric power and being relatively easily re-cycled at lower temperatures. Its history in the UK dates back to the late nineteenth century when smelters were built in…

Spark Festival Lincoln

The Spark Festival held in Lincoln Cathedral is a celebration of Lincolnshire engineering – past, present and future. Lincolnshire is home to much of the story of British manufacturing- not least the efforts made to wrestle with the mud of the county’s wonderfully productive agricultural land which provided the technology for the tank, a Lincoln…

The Festival of Britain 1951 – as a pivotal event

I ended How Britain Shaped the Manufacturing World with the Festival of Britain and it is the starting point for the sequel, Whatever Happened to British Manufacturing. In many ways the Festival marked a transition in British manufacturing. ‘THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF A NATION is presented for the first time in this Festival of Britain and…

The Great Exhibition of 1851

On 1 May, 1851, Queen Victoria opened the ‘Great Exhibition of Industrial Advances’ in Hyde Park to some 20,000 visitors on the first day alone. The exhibition had been promoted from July 1949 by Prince Albert and Sir Henry Cole , President of the Royal Society of Arts, and it went through many and long…

Do company directors always act in the best interests of their companies?

Do boards of directors of UK manufacturing companies always act in the best interests of UK manufacturing? In England, company directors owe their duty to shareholders subject to laws protecting employees, consumers and the environment. Directors Duties. The 2006 Companies Act says they should have regard to the interests of other stakeholders, but in practice…

Lucas – King of the Air

Lucas occupied a special place in the aircraft industry supplying electrical systems for aircraft. The number of aircraft manufactured in the UK before and during WW2 was enormous and under continuous development, and so Lucas engineers were busy not only manufacturing but researching and designing new products. For example, some 200,000 Rotax magnetos had been…

Textiles in Lancashire

The Macclesfield canal was the last and most technically advanced of the British canals. It was completed in 1831. Just two years later, work began on two equally modern mule mills for the production of cotton The Swindells family of Bollington built the Clarence and Adelphi cotton mills both powered by steam. Over the next…

Lucas – King of the Road (and air)

Lucas were the backbone of the British motor industry right from the start. The three generations of the Lucas family strongly supported by non-family chairmen including Peter Bennett and Bernard Scott led the way in technical innovation, manufacturing efficiency and marketing. It was not by accident that they supplied nearly three quarters of the British…

The British Motor Industry and Semiconductors

Exploring the story of the motor industry since WW2, its forthcoming demise was never far from the conversation. Equally, digging into the history of semiconductor manufacturers, the possibility of the UK not being relatively self sufficient is an ever present agony. In the sixties, the Ryder report had this to say: ‘‘vehicle production is the…

Loading…

Something went wrong. Please refresh the page and/or try again.


Follow My Blog

Get new content delivered directly to your inbox.

%d bloggers like this: